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Apple Watch could detect the long-term effects of COVID-19


For users of the Apple watch They are young and healthy, they do not realize that they are wearing a device on their wrist that at any given moment can save their life, or help them prevent an ailment that without their smartwatch they would not have discovered the worst.

Several medical studies are investigating whether wearables such as the Apple Watch could help detect and cope with the long-term effects that the coronavirus. Any help is good, no matter how small.

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, a few medical studies have set out to determine whether wearables like the Apple Watch can detect early signs and symptoms of COVID-19. A new article published today in the magazine JAMA Network Open It highlights that wearables like the Apple Watch and Fitbit could also provide data on the long-term effects of COVID-19.

The new data comes from the Digital Engagement and Tracking for Early Control and Treatment (DETECT) trial led by scientists at the Scripps Research Translational Institute in California. This study was conducted from March 25, 2020 to January 24, 2021 and included more than 37,000 people wearing Fitbits, Apple Watches and other wearables. The study was powered by the MyDataHelps research application.

Changes in wearable data are evident after being infected

In October they published that the combination of data from the Apple Watch and Fitbit with reported symptoms led to more accurate detection of COVID-19 cases, than only the cases reported without owning a wearable.

Now, researchers are digging into the data with a focus on the Long-term effects of COVID-19. At first, researchers have focused on the data provided by wearables. A much larger change in resting heart rate has been detected for people who had Covid compared to other viral infections. Obvious changes have also been detected in the steps taken per day and in sleep.

Several of these studies are still ongoing, to try to establish a more direct relationship between the data offered by the wearables of people who have been infected by the happy coronavirus.

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